All too often when it comes to leaving a Spinal Cord Injury Centre, people find that suitable housing isn't available.  Instead, they can end up staying in hospital longer than necessary, or being discharged to somewhere that simply isn’t appropriate.

This can mean anything from returning to a house where they will have to wash in the kitchen because the bathroom is inaccessible, to only being able to leave the property when friends or family are around to carry them out to the pavement outside.

Aspire's research: 

Wheelchair accessible social housing

Our research uncovered a shocking situation: five Local Authorities will take over 50 years at current allocation rates to house those wheelchair users currently on their waiting lists and nearly one in five of the Authorities that responded will take over 20 years to clear their current waiting list, and that presumes that no new wheelchair user applies for housing in the meantime.  Read more about our research into wheelchair accessible social housing 2018.

The impact of housing spinal injured people in inaccessible housing

As a follow up to our research on people living in care homes, we commissioned Loughborough University to do another report, looking at the impact of housing spinal injured people in inaccessible housing. Read more about the Loughborough Report 2015

The impact on spinal cord injured people living in nursing homes

Our research shows that 20% of people with spinal cord injury are discharged to nursing homes. In 2012, we commissioned Loughborough University to look into the impact on spinal cord injured people living in nursing homes.  Read more about the Loughborough Report 2012.